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Author Topic: Galaxy class rim
Bernd
Guy from Old Europe
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(I hope you don't mind if I repost what I already wrote at the SCN.)

I completed this little article a few days ago:
http://www.ex-astris-scientia.org/articles/galaxy.htm

I still need to correct the image heading of the "Generations" screen cap because it shows the 6ft model again (obviously, because there are no raised panels visible). However, as the model was almost always filmed upside down, we rarely see the top of the saucer or a head-on view of the ship. I sifted throught the episode screen caps at TrekCore but found only some small views of either the old 6ft or the new 4ft model. The one from "The Big Good-Bye" seems to be the best by far. Maybe someone remembers a great top or front view of the ship?

(Note that, while the 4ft model replaced the 6ft model in all new shots, stock footage from the first season is shown until the end of the series, so basically any model may appear any time, only the first season is completely with the thin rim.)

Also, while it is obvious that two different heights of the rim exist (its height has doubled on the 4ft model relative to the 6ft model), I am not so sure about the Nebula class any longer.
http://www.ex-astris-scientia.org/articles/nebula.htm

On the Nebula the saucer rim always appeared taller to me than on the Galaxy, but could it be that I was just comparing it to the 6ft model with its low rim? On the other hand, on this picture I think we see the 4ft model of the Galaxy class:
http://www.ex-astris-scientia.org/articles/nebula/nebula-galaxy-ventral.jpg

What do you all think?

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Bernd Schneider

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Bernd
Guy from Old Europe
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Update: I have added several pictures and corrected a few things.

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Bernd Schneider

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Johnny
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I read your article yesterday and was surprised at how much of a discrepancy there is between the different models. I suppose I'd always been peripherally aware that the 4 ft was bumpier, but I hadn't paid enough interest to see what exactly was going on there.

Anyway, I don't think this is quite what you're looking for, but I know that every resource can be helpful in putting together a picture of how a physical object is constructed.

I found this photo a while ago on Flickr and haven't seen it anywhere else. Could do with being sharper, but maybe you can glean something from it.

http://www.johnpearse.partsking.net/2198868_885a2a6643_o.jpg

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Reverend
Based on a true story...
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Just a thought, but could Probert's "saucer rim/Observation corridor" concept live on in the likes of the Cheyenne and New Orleans, or are those rims too thin as well?

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Peregrinus
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The Cheyenne definitely is too thin, and there are no windows on the rim. The NO, maybe.

--Jonah

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"That's what I like about these high school girls, I keep getting older, they stay the same age."

--David "Woody" Wooderson, Dazed and Confused

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Bernd
Guy from Old Europe
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We don't really know how thick the rim is on the Cheyenne. If there were windows, it may be possible. The New Orleans is a definite candidate because the overall dimensions were roughly halved (by combining the windows of two decks to one). But there are no windows either.

http://www.ex-astris-scientia.org/articles/neworleans/kyushu-c2.jpg

That's a great photo, Johnny! Just what I was looking for to illustrate the model sizes.

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Bernd Schneider

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Peregrinus
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 -

This is the unmodified image from the Behind-the-Scenes card set. Seems pretty straightforward. Wndows on the dorsal bulge at least, probably ventral, too, but none on the flat rim.

--Jonah

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"That's what I like about these high school girls, I keep getting older, they stay the same age."

--David "Woody" Wooderson, Dazed and Confused

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Bernd
Guy from Old Europe
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Since this seems to be the only photo that exists of the Cheyenne model, I based my whole reconstruction on it. I assumed that the rim is thicker compare to the Galaxy class. I don't remember exactly where the idea comes from though.

http://www.ex-astris-scientia.org/articles/cheyenne.htm

Anyone have the 1/2500 scale model of the Enterprise-D? Is the groove (the sensor strip) part of the upper or the lower half of the saucer? In the first case, Miarecki may have inserted a gap made of polystyrene strips between the two lower halves he used, because otherwise they would have been flush. In the latter case the gap between the two halves would be naturally wider unless he filed it down.

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Bernd Schneider

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Shik
There's a million things I haven't done, but just you wait
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quote:
Originally posted by Bernd:
Anyone have the 1/2500 scale model of the Enterprise-D? Is the groove (the sensor strip) part of the upper or the lower half of the saucer? In the first case, Miarecki may have inserted a gap made of polystyrene strips between the two lower halves he used, because otherwise they would have been flush. In the latter case the gap between the two halves would be naturally wider unless he filed it down.

It's part of the upper half. There is indeed a very obvious styrene spacer set in there to make a full deck height.

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"I never agreed with Jefferson once—we have fought on like seventy-five different fronts. But when all is said & all is done...Jefferson HAS beliefs; Burr has none."

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Jason Abbadon
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Agreed- there is a spacer there- otherwise the saucer's edge is razor-thin.
As to the Observation corridor idea, it's not impossible that there are (Enterprise A sized)porthole-sized windows there that would not show up on so small a model.

More likely, the saucer's rim serves as a sensor- something to replace the old ventral sensor on starships like the Connie or Excelsior class.
Possibly a targeting sensor for the saucer's phasers, or even the field emitter for the ship's shields (my personal favorite idea).

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-Aeschylus, Agamemnon

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Reverend
Based on a true story...
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Well, my thinking was that regardless to whether they're on the models or not, the structure is to the right scale so that if someone were to build a proper model (3D or plastic) the details could be added to reflect Probert's corridor concept. after all these were just low detail study models, so there's room for interpretation.

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Bernd
Guy from Old Europe
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quote:
It's part of the upper half. There is indeed a very obvious styrene spacer set in there to make a full deck height.
That may have been the reason why I assumed the gap is relatively wider than on the GCS. It's been a long time...

quote:
Well, my thinking was that regardless to whether they're on the models or not, the structure is to the right scale so that if someone were to build a proper model (3D or plastic) the details could be added to reflect Probert's corridor concept. after all these were just low detail study models, so there's room for interpretation.
Agreed. The 1/2500 scale model simply can't show all the details to make the ship credible. Some bigger models are even less suited for display on screen. *cough* DS9TM *cough*.
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Peregrinus
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Well, I'm making a re-creation of this 1:1400 Cheyenne. As a study model, the detial is lacking, but it's fun to fix things. Sanding off the raised shield grid, and scoring it instead. Making a smoother join between the bridge module and the saucer. Adding a narrow "neck" over the bussard coils so there's actually a proper attach point for the nacelles. Things lie that. Add the mottled hull-plate effect, and it'll be pretty sweet.

--JOnah

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"That's what I like about these high school girls, I keep getting older, they stay the same age."

--David "Woody" Wooderson, Dazed and Confused

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Amasov Prime
lensfare-induced epileptic shock
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Just to add my 2 Quatloos, I always liked the way the older Nebula-version had less windows on its upper saucer. Made it look more like a "real" starship and less like a 24th century starliner... thinking of it, "too many windows" was one of the few things I hated about the Galaxy, in comparison to the 1701 and the A. You don't need to do that to get a sense of scope and largeness. Maybe I'll prep an image of a window-reduced Galaxy, just to see how it looks...


PS: I just checked the other thread about the lost FC-designs. 4 years. Can't believe it...

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Jason Abbadon
Rolls with the punches.
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The huge windows on the Galaxy are annoying- the ventral windows are several decks high, while many can only be skylights (or possibly windows for rooms with varible gravity- rooms ar right angles to the door).

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Justice inclines her scales so that wisdom comes at the price of suffering.
-Aeschylus, Agamemnon

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