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» Flare Sci-Fi Forums » Star Trek » Starships & Technology » 1701 built on earth's surface? (Page 9)

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Author Topic: 1701 built on earth's surface?
Peregrinus
Curmudgeon-at-Large
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When the SIF and IDF are operating, yes. Which I don't expect whilst the vessel is still being welded together.

The warp coils are made in microgravity furnaces in orbit, so the alloys are perfectly blended and not stratified at all. They're the most massive parts of the ship. Why make them off the surface, land them, assemble the engine, attach them to the ship, and then use the impulse engines and thrusters (and probably tugs) to lift them back off the surface?

(And warp drive is non-Newtonian. You could cross the galaxy at a standstill, relatively speaking. [Wink] )

--Jonah

--------------------
"That's what I like about these high school girls, I keep getting older, they stay the same age."

--David "Woody" Wooderson, Dazed and Confused

Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged
Daniel Butler
I'm a Singapore where is my boat
Member # 1689

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quote:
When the SIF and IDF are operating, yes. Which I don't expect whilst the vessel is still being welded together.
Why not? You don't think they're capable of projecting them from the construction facility?

When did they say on-screen the coils are made in orbit? Anyway they have anti-gravity, hence they could build the coils - or, say, the whole ship - in micro-gravity on the surface.

Did they ever say it's non-Newtonian, even, on-screen? They definitely have inertial dampers for *some* reason after all. Even if the *warp* drive is non-Newtonian, the impulse drive sure isn't. Hence the name. And the accelerations involved in getting up to full impulse, which is .25c, in any reasonable amount of time are still a hell of a lot more than 9.8m/s^2.

Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
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